Counter Intelligence

Half a Loaf is Better Than None

Posted in District of Columbia by melissamccart on May 26, 2009

In traipsing around to learn more about breads, one thing I’ve noticed is that chefs-turned-bakers have a soft spot for the Pullman loaf. Despite that it’s not as prestigious as a finicky sourdough or as high brow as artisan baguettes, the Pullman loaf is as American as baseball despite its French moniker, pain de mie.  A couple weeks ago, Rustico’s Frank Morales baked a white and honey wheat Pullman while I was there. And at Restaurant Eve’s Lickety Split, I ordered EcoFriendly ham and swiss on toasted Pullman with homemade potato chips. Yum.

Pullman– named for the train car–bakes in pans that yield Wonder Bread-and Pepperidge Farm-shaped loaves, but a hell of a lot more flavorful. Traditionally, a Pullman loaf  is white sandwich bread that’s all crumb and little crust, though bakers such as Morales riff on flavor. Since sandwiches are the trend, it’s no surprise the Pullman loaf is on the rise.  Apparently, the Pullman pan is still a rare commodity among home bakers. Its renaissance in home kitchens is yet to come.

With tomato season coming up, Pullman bread is natural pairing for one of these sandwiches, for homemade peanut butter and jelly, or for French toast. Where else have you seen homemade Pullman loaves?

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One Response

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  1. Emily said, on May 27, 2009 at 1:52 pm

    Hey Melissa,
    It’s Emily Samuel, after I left 2911 I went to work for Lyon Bakery, a local artisan gourmet bakery in SW DC. We do strictly wholesale, but we are one of the last who do a lot of our breads by hand. I still follow your blog religiously, and after reading, I thought I’d pipe up and offer you a tour or *samples* if you’d like. We do a Jalapeno Cheddar that will rock your world.

    Hope all is well and you’re eating deliciously.

    Best,
    Emily


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